Guide Coaching Across Cultures: New Tools for Leveraging National, Corporate, and Professional Differences

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  1. Making cultural intelligence one of your signature skills.
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  7. Cultural Communication Patterns 2.

This requires us as coaches to do our own cultural work. A newly formed diverse global team who had previously worked as separate local teams, worked through the stages of cultural development defined by Bennett with the help of a coach. A major company with local operations in a number of countries began globalizing their teams and standardizing approaches. Work teams became increasingly diverse. For one global IT team, their success, survival and on-time completion of projects became dependent upon their ability to overcome differences and learn to trust each other.

They acknowledged cultural differences but clearly were not happy about being organized into a single team. Trust was at an all-time low. The Europeans did not trust the Americans to get the job done.

The Americans did not like the rules coming down from the corporate headquarters in Europe. These meetings took place in.

Ethnocentric

Switzerland, Germany, France and the UK so team members had the chance to experience a variety of local cultures as part of these events. The team included Americans black, white, Chinese and Filipino , Germans, French, Swiss, English, Australian, Christian, Muslim, male, female, young, middle-aged, slim, overweight, athletic and non-athletic. To get to know each other and support each other in the challenges that some could do more easily than others, they learned to let go of the need to control and began to listen and include. Their face-to-face team building experiences for the first several years of their global teamwork led to a high level of trust and friendship.

They started with sharing their stories and learning about each other while working on physical and intellectual challenges, while taking long hikes, and over laughter and drinks in the bar.

Cross-Cultural Management

The trust equipped them to work together around the clock, like a well-oiled machine, using the time differences around the globe to keep the projects moving. In addition to their work-related collaborations, they expanded their connection by organizing video conferences simply to gather together to help team members in another country celebrate a life event.

Bennett, M. Towards ethnorelativism: A developmental model of intercultural sensitivity. Paige ed. Yarmouth, ME: Intercultural Press. Rosinski, Philippe, As faculty at Leadership that Works, they certify coaches who offer personal, organization and community transformation. For more articles like this, go to the Library for Transformation. Leadership that Works, Inc. We take a stand for whole person transformation, and bring diverse voices into the field, developing multicultural competencies in coaching and facilitation.

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Read More. Find a Coach Event Calendar. Leadership That Works. About the Library Submission Guidelines. Ethnocentric 1 Denial deny that cultural differences exist; disinterest; avoidance 2 Defense acknowledge cultural differences—construct defenses against them; view them negatively; us vs. These meetings took place in Switzerland, Germany, France and the UK so team members had the chance to experience a variety of local cultures as part of these events.

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CROSS-CULTURAL EFFECTIVENESS

About Us. High context cultures focus on the implicit meanings and nuances in communication with great attention give to nonverbal and context. Low context cultures use more direct and specific communication. Without understanding these differences, assumptions get made and relationships can be compromised. In direct cultures, messages are offered, even when difficult or risky, with an explicit message.

Cross Cultural Competency by Lasley, Kellogg, Michaels and Brown

In indirect cultures, there is effort to sustain relationships even when the message is misunderstood due lack of direct delivery. We often see this play out in conflict situations between individuals and groups. As you analyze yourself and groups you work in, consider how consciousness of your own communication patterns might make you more effective. How might you paraphrase a person with a different pattern?


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  • What kinds of questions might make you uncomfortable given your own patterns? What might be some things to consider in a dialogue or coaching conversation with a person with a different pattern?